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Story Book

These are the stories of our amazing TMWR volunteers.

Miracle Bunny

Miracle Bunny

This cottontail bunny was released after 5 weeks in our care. Our little "miracle bunny" came in at 2 to 3 days of age. Cottontails are the most difficult to rehab, specially when they come this young. Thank you Cathy for all you do!

It has been raining opossums!

It has been raining opossums!

The Virginia Opossum is the only marsupial in North America and although most people dislike them they are very beneficial animals since they eat rodents, ticks, and roaches. They are consider the cleaning crew. They are also resistant to the native snakes poison and they will kill them. Baby opossums are the size of a bumble bee when they are born. They will crawl into the mothers pouch latching to one of the 13 teats and they will stay in the pouch for over 6o days.

Update on Hope

Update on Hope

the juvenile raccoon that came last Thanksgiving

Last November one of our rehabbers took in a female juvenile raccoon brought in by a Biologist, who works for the US Fish and Wildlife Dept. overseeing construction sites. She was covered with ticks, unable to stand or even walk , and she only weighed 8 to 10 lbs. She made improvements each day that was under our care and we named her Hope. By January her back legs were still weak and at times she would fall. X-rays did not show a problem. She was transferred to a nice couple who specializes in raccoons. They had a pair of male raccoons that were being wintered, Butch and Cassidy, who welcomed her into the family. For a while the rehabbers did not think she was going to be released, but you would not believe my joy when they texted that Hope was going to be free! Their patience, care, and dedication had paid off. This is why we do what we do, because there is always hope.

The AT&T pinkies

The AT&T pinkies

Monday morning a few weeks ago brought in some calls after a storm. These 4 pinkies came from an AT&T service man who found them while checking an aerial terminal after mama squirrel got scared and run away. He has tried reuniting before but when he has come back days later, he has found the babies dead; this time he wanted to make sure those babies would have a chance. After a call to our nearest rehabilitator she was able to coordinate with the nice gentleman and take them in. These babies will be ready for release in May.

Hope

Hope

Stories like this one, are what keep us, wildlife rehabilitators, doing what we do. Thank you to all who care and make the effort to rescue and bring us the wildlife in need.

This juvenile raccoon was admitted into rehab after Thanksgiving, when she was found at a major road construction site. The workers had seen it lying around and notified the person in charge of environmental; Jennifer, a biologist with the Wildlife & Fisheries Dept. Upon reaching the job site, she knew right away that the raccoon needed help ASAP, if it was going to survive. After making several calls, she got in contact with a rehabber that had moved out of state, but who referred her to a local rehabilitator. The raccoon was very lethargic and unable to move. Jennifer was able to cover the raccoon with a sheet and transported it to the rehabilitator. Upon examination, it turned out to be a female juvenile, born this past summer. The rehabber was not sure if the raccoon was going to make it; she was very dehydrated, severely emaciated, unable to move; but it was alert. After sedating her, physical examination showed no swelling or broken limbs; however, she was infested with ticks. While under sedation the majority of ticks were removed and she was also rehydrated subcutaneously. Once awake, she was given fluids orally with a syringe. After a couple of days of fluids and a liquid diet an improvement was noticed. That is when she was given the name Hope. She continues to improve day by day. First, she was able to put weight on all legs; next, she was able to take a step; yesterday, she got out of the cage and tried to climb. She still has a long recovery but we are hoping, that come next spring , Hope will be able to run free again.

Nature at Work

Nature at Work

Even though we do not rehab these beneficial critters, they also benefit from what we do. Other animals use abandoned dens or nests: Screech owls nest in the spring inside abandoned squirrel nests, opossums also take refuge inside them. Everything in life is connected! We all depend on each other to survive.

Meet "Boo"

Meet "Boo"

Believe it or not, we are still taking squirrels into rehab. As I was handing candies to the children on Halloween, I got a call from a gentleman. He had found a frighten squirrel on a bush and was concerned for the squirrel's safety because of his cats. I agreed to take it in and an hour later the door bell rang. When I opened the door I had a bowl of candies in my hands and there was the gentleman with the squirrel in a box. We both laughed as I said,"Trick or treat?" The nice gentleman who rescued the orphaned squirrel told me I could give the little guy some Halloween name and so he was named Boo, because he was very scared. Boo, who is 7 weeks old, now has two girlfriends, Lily and Bertha. He will have company during the winter as they wait to be released in April once trees get their new leaves.

The Ruby Slipper's Squirrel (True story)

The Ruby Slipper's Squirrel (True story)

"There is no place like home", is what this Golden Mantle squirrel said when it finally got free.

This little critter got into a family's car as they were packing to come back home from a vacation in New Mexico.

They realized they had some type of critter in their car when they noticed droppings on the car seat and dashboard, as they got back from hiking in Palo Duro Canyon State Park. Once at home, the nice lady figured out that the little critter, who looked like a chipmunk, was not going to make it here in Arlington, TX. She made a few calls and was referred to a local wildlife rehabilitator by a River Legacy employee. When she started telling her story to the rehabber, you will not believe what the rehabber told her: " I happen to be traveling to New Mexico in 5 days". Too funny! After successfully trapping the animal, it was moved to a cage with food and water. On a Friday morning, the squirrel started her trip back to NM. After an overnight stay at a hotel she was set free on Sunday morning in the back woods of another wildlife rehabilitator who had recently relocated to Angel Fire, NM. They feed all kind of wildlife so its new home comes with a meal plan and she also said that it will have plenty of friends.

Sometimes it takes a village to help an animal in need. Thank you for caring about our wildlife.

Babycakes

Babycakes

This little girl was orphaned when her mother was frightened by a large dog and ran; Babycakes was not hanging on tight enough and fell off. She is about 60 days old, weighs 59 grams, and has recently opened her eyes. She is uninjured and healthy, and will be ready for release when she weighs about a pound (450 grams) - two to three months from now.

More babies

More babies

We thought you might like to see a few more types of rehab babies.

Fox - this is Wolfie....came in as a 5 day old grey fox kit, he is 4 weeks old in this picture.

Fawn - this is a 2 week old fawn.

Bobcat - this is Sassy, a 2 week old bobcat kitten, she is now 5 weeks old.

Baby girl pulls thru thanks to team work

Baby girl pulls thru thanks to team work

Sometimes it takes a team effort to save a life. This baby raccoon came from Glen Rose Dinosaur Park. A camper found it by a trail and a nice Park Ranger drove her all the way to a rehabber in Arlington. She was loaded with fleas, very dehydrated, and on top of that she had multiple injuries. In spite of all this, she had a good appetite and took well to the bottle. After a few days on antibiotics, more abscesses appeared on her back, head, and shoulder that required a visit to our great veterinarian. It will be almost 3 weeks now and her wounds are healing plus she has put in some weight. She is younger that the bright-eye buddy to her right but he loves to play with her. They both went to a rehabber who will continue their care until released. Thank you all who helped!

Spider bite

Spider bite

This young juvenile opossum was bitten by a brown recluse. A rehabber got him about four weeks ago and the bite area is getting worse before it will get better. He will heal and be released, but may require surgery due to the necrotized tissue in the jaw.

It's April and starting to rain raccoons

It's April and starting to rain raccoons

Meet Paulie! He came in last Sunday. A gentleman who was hunting found him alone on a trail. He put him in his shirt to keep him warm and contacted one of our members. When he came in, he weighed 77g and his umbilical cord was still attached. He is taking the bottle well and is tipping the scale at 97grams. He had to pay our vet a visit due to labored breathing. We all hope he grows up to be a big Paul!

Update on mama opossum and babies

Update on mama opossum and babies

The babies have grown and explore out of the pouch occasionally. They don't go far from mom. I examined one to make sure she had a full belly but mom did not like that and she showed me all 50 of her teeth to scare me away. I only had the baby for a few seconds then I put it back.

Surrogate mother adopts baby

Surrogate mother adopts baby

On Wednesday evening, a neighbor called about an orphaned baby possum in her yard. Since it looked healthy, maybe our recovering mama opossum would not mind to foster another baby; so the rehabber placed it in the mama opossum's pouch and walked away.

Next morning, when the rehabber checked on the mother and babies, she found that the baby had attached himself to a nipple and that was happily nursing among the other babies. Happy ending!

Opossum Story

Opossum Story

This female young adult opossum was found in the road. She was not hit by a car but was attacked by an animal, probably a large dog or a fox. The animal had her head in its mouth and a canine tooth punctured the possums right eye. When the socket dries up it will be sewn shut. She has 6 babies (that can be seen) in her pouch. She was extremely underweight upon intake and has had to have 350ml subQ fluids everyday for a week. As of Thursday she is finally eating.

Cupid Update

Cupid Update

Remember when Cupid was 20 days old and weighed 70 grams...well, now at 34 days old she is weighing in at 151 grams and is as cute as she can be.

Meet Cupid

Meet Cupid

He is one of our first cottontail bunny of the season. He was rescued from a cat by a nice lady.

Cupid is a very healthy and feisty bunny. He is probably over 2 weeks old and will be in rehab for another 3 weeks.

Cottontails-The First 2017 Intakes

Cottontails-The First 2017 Intakes

The first couple of intakes for 2017 were not babies, as it usually happens, but they were two adult cottontails.

The first one was not as lucky since it came with fatal injuries and could not be saved; the second one is a young male who at first was believed he have been caught under a fence and got injured, but after a closer inspection it was found to have a bot-fly larva buried on his back near his tail. He is recovering nicely after the larva was successfully removed.

Upcoming Events
Class: Advanced Topics (Day 2 of 2)
Sun Jun 25, 2017 9:00am
Class: Opossum Care
Sat Jul 8, 2017 8:30am
Class: Raccoon Care
Sat Jul 8, 2017 1:00pm
TMWR GENERAL MEETING
Sun Jul 16, 2017 2:00pm
Bat Rehabilitation Workshop
Sat Jul 22, 2017 8:30am
Story Book
Miracle Bunny
Miracle Bunny
This cottontail bunny was released after 5 weeks in our...
It has been raining opossums!
It has been raining opossums!
The Virginia Opossum is the only marsupial in North Amer...
Update on Hope
Update on Hope
the juvenile raccoon that came last Thanksgiving Last N...