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Story Book

These are the stories of our amazing TMWR volunteers.

Didi story

Didi story

Sometimes it takes a village to rehab a squirrel... That was the case of Didi, a six week old female squirrel that was found by a very nice couple from Canada while they were touring the Dealey Plaza in Dallas. They took the time and contacted Dallas Animal Services, who contacted a rehabber in Arlington; the couple then drove all the way to Arlington to get help for this very dehydrated and emaciated baby. The rehabber was not sure if the baby was going to pull through, but after a couple of days Didi was on her way to recovery and was matched with another young female squirrel because they do better if raised with others. They continued their rehabilitation process under a new volunteer and once weaned they spent a few weeks outdoors in a prerelease cage before they were successfully released. Thanks to Dallas AS, the nice Canadian couple, and the rehabbers another life was saved.

Sometimes it takes a village to rehab a squirrel

Sometimes it takes a village to rehab a squirrel

That was the case of Didi, a six week old female squirrel that was found by a very nice couple from Canada while they were touring the Dealey Plaza in Dallas. They took the time and contacted Dallas Animal Services, who contacted a rehabber in Arlington; the couple then drove all the way to Arlington to get help for this very dehydrated and emaciated baby. The rehabber was not sure if the baby was going to pull through, but after a couple of days Didi was on her way to recovery and was matched with another young female squirrel because they do better if raised with others. They continued their rehabilitation process under a new volunteer and once weaned they spent a few weeks outdoors in a prerelease cage before they were successfully released. Thanks to Dallas AS, the nice Canadian couple, and the rehabbers another life was saved.

Cottontails

Cottontails

It takes only a few weeks to rehab a cottontail; and although it is the least costly species to rehab, it is the most challenging because of their higher mortality rate when compared to other species. When a nest of cottontails is found the best thing to do is to let them be, unless one is sure that the mother is dead. Mother rabbit will not stay with their kits to avoid attracting predators, so when humans find a nest their first reaction is to "rescue" them because they are orphans. The mother rabbit will come and feed the babies during the night. Neonate cottontails have a very small chance (less than 3%) to make it in rehab but once the eyes open (9 to 10 days) the survival rate increases. Cottontails are ready to be on their own when they are 5 weeks old, at this time they are the size of a tennis ball or a hand fist.

Baby Raccoon

Baby Raccoon

Alice has just taken in this tiny baby female raccoon, who is just 3 days old. Her mother evidently was killed by a dog, along with two other babies. Weighing a whopping 61g (just over 2 ounces), she will be in rehab for six months. Fir now, she will be fed five times per day, while she waits for foster siblings to grow up with.

The ultimate sacrifice

The ultimate sacrifice

Although hawks prefer to go after birds, they also prey on squirrels and other small mammals specially during baby season.

This baby just came in, probably the mama squirrel made the ultimate sacrifice to save her baby. This is an account from Adam, who witnessed it: "I happened to walk into our alley when I saw a mother squirrel on one side of the alley struggling while trying to get away from a hawk, but the hawk quickly flew away with her. I them heard a high pitch noise from the other side of the alley where I found the injured baby squirrel". Adam found one of our dedicated wildlife rehabbers, Julie, who is taking care of the baby squirrel.

The ones we cannot save

The ones we cannot save

We usually try to put stories with a happy ending; everybody likes that. This was not the case when we took in this juvenile squirrel. She came in with lots of issues: upper respiratory infection, an injured eye, and possible pneumonia. One of our dedicated rehabilitator went and purchased a humidifier so she could put it in her enclosure. After trying everything from antibiotics, breathing treatments, and tender care she had to make the tough decision to euthanize her because she was suffering so much. Sometimes, this is the last gift we can offer to these animals.

Miracle Bunny

Miracle Bunny

This cottontail bunny was released after 5 weeks in our care. Our little "miracle bunny" came in at 2 to 3 days of age. Cottontails are the most difficult to rehab, specially when they come this young. Thank you Cathy for all you do!

It has been raining opossums!

It has been raining opossums!

The Virginia Opossum is the only marsupial in North America and although most people dislike them they are very beneficial animals since they eat rodents, ticks, and roaches. They are consider the cleaning crew. They are also resistant to the native snakes poison and they will kill them. Baby opossums are the size of a bumble bee when they are born. They will crawl into the mothers pouch latching to one of the 13 teats and they will stay in the pouch for over 6o days.

Update on Hope

Update on Hope

the juvenile raccoon that came last Thanksgiving

Last November one of our rehabbers took in a female juvenile raccoon brought in by a Biologist, who works for the US Fish and Wildlife Dept. overseeing construction sites. She was covered with ticks, unable to stand or even walk , and she only weighed 8 to 10 lbs. She made improvements each day that was under our care and we named her Hope. By January her back legs were still weak and at times she would fall. X-rays did not show a problem. She was transferred to a nice couple who specializes in raccoons. They had a pair of male raccoons that were being wintered, Butch and Cassidy, who welcomed her into the family. For a while the rehabbers did not think she was going to be released, but you would not believe my joy when they texted that Hope was going to be free! Their patience, care, and dedication had paid off. This is why we do what we do, because there is always hope.

The AT&T pinkies

The AT&T pinkies

Monday morning a few weeks ago brought in some calls after a storm. These 4 pinkies came from an AT&T service man who found them while checking an aerial terminal after mama squirrel got scared and run away. He has tried reuniting before but when he has come back days later, he has found the babies dead; this time he wanted to make sure those babies would have a chance. After a call to our nearest rehabilitator she was able to coordinate with the nice gentleman and take them in. These babies will be ready for release in May.

Hope

Hope

Stories like this one, are what keep us, wildlife rehabilitators, doing what we do. Thank you to all who care and make the effort to rescue and bring us the wildlife in need.

This juvenile raccoon was admitted into rehab after Thanksgiving, when she was found at a major road construction site. The workers had seen it lying around and notified the person in charge of environmental; Jennifer, a biologist with the Wildlife & Fisheries Dept. Upon reaching the job site, she knew right away that the raccoon needed help ASAP, if it was going to survive. After making several calls, she got in contact with a rehabber that had moved out of state, but who referred her to a local rehabilitator. The raccoon was very lethargic and unable to move. Jennifer was able to cover the raccoon with a sheet and transported it to the rehabilitator. Upon examination, it turned out to be a female juvenile, born this past summer. The rehabber was not sure if the raccoon was going to make it; she was very dehydrated, severely emaciated, unable to move; but it was alert. After sedating her, physical examination showed no swelling or broken limbs; however, she was infested with ticks. While under sedation the majority of ticks were removed and she was also rehydrated subcutaneously. Once awake, she was given fluids orally with a syringe. After a couple of days of fluids and a liquid diet an improvement was noticed. That is when she was given the name Hope. She continues to improve day by day. First, she was able to put weight on all legs; next, she was able to take a step; yesterday, she got out of the cage and tried to climb. She still has a long recovery but we are hoping, that come next spring , Hope will be able to run free again.

Nature at Work

Nature at Work

Even though we do not rehab these beneficial critters, they also benefit from what we do. Other animals use abandoned dens or nests: Screech owls nest in the spring inside abandoned squirrel nests, opossums also take refuge inside them. Everything in life is connected! We all depend on each other to survive.

Meet "Boo"

Meet "Boo"

Believe it or not, we are still taking squirrels into rehab. As I was handing candies to the children on Halloween, I got a call from a gentleman. He had found a frighten squirrel on a bush and was concerned for the squirrel's safety because of his cats. I agreed to take it in and an hour later the door bell rang. When I opened the door I had a bowl of candies in my hands and there was the gentleman with the squirrel in a box. We both laughed as I said,"Trick or treat?" The nice gentleman who rescued the orphaned squirrel told me I could give the little guy some Halloween name and so he was named Boo, because he was very scared. Boo, who is 7 weeks old, now has two girlfriends, Lily and Bertha. He will have company during the winter as they wait to be released in April once trees get their new leaves.

Upcoming Events
Class: Opossum Care
Sat Jun 23, 2018 8:30am
Class: Raccoon Care
Sat Jun 23, 2018 1:00pm
TMWR General Meeting
Sun Jul 15, 2018 2:00pm
Volunteer Orientation
Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:30am
Class: Wildlife Rehabilitation Skills Workshop: Introduction to Wildlife Rehabilitation
Sat Jul 28, 2018 8:30am
Story Book
Didi story
Didi story
Sometimes it takes a village to rehab a squirrel... Tha...
Sometimes it takes a village to rehab a squirrel
Sometimes it takes a village to rehab a squirrel
That was the case of Didi, a six week old female squirre...
Cottontails
Cottontails
It takes only a few weeks to rehab a cottontail; and alt...